Category Archives: History

Seeking the History of Screened Porches – 

Anyone who has experienced one has to admit that a screened porch is a wonderful addition to any house. A screened porch offers the breezes, scents, sounds, and sights of being outdoors – but without the bugs and the blazing sun. In rural areas – before air conditioning became rampant – many people used a screened porch as a bunk room on particularly sweltering summer nights.

Source: Seeking the History of Screened Porches – Of Mice and Mountain Men Blog – GRIT Magazine

The History of Window Screens | Hunker

Sunset through the mosquito screen

More often than not in times past, the gentle buzz of a summer evening led to the furious scratching of a sleepless night. That is, until the Civil War changed everything. Humans have fought the good fight between insects and fresh air with solid shutters, leather door drapes and the misery of sweat-soaked bedding, but science and surplus revolutionized window treatments with the wire mesh screen.

Source: The History of Window Screens | Hunker

Window screen History- Wikipedia

Insect schrim.jpg

A window screen (also known as insect screen, bug screen, fly screen, wire mesh) is designed to cover the opening of a window. It is usually a mesh made of metal wire, fiberglass, or other synthetic fiber and stretched in a frame of wood or metal. It serves to keep leaves, debris, insects, birds, and other animals from entering a building or a screened structure such as a porch, without blocking fresh air-flow.

Source: Window screen – Wikipedia

The History of Window Screens (with Pictures) | eHow

More often than not in times past, the gentle buzz of a summer evening led to the furious scratching of a sleepless night. That is, until the Civil War changed everything. Humans have fought the good fight between insects and fresh air with solid shutters, leather door drapes and the misery of sweat-soaked bedding, but science and surplus revolutionized window treatments with the wire mesh screen.

Source: The History of Window Screens (with Pictures) | eHow

Window screen – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A window screen (also known as insect screen, bug screen, fly screen, flyscreen or flywire) is designed to cover the opening of a window. It is usually a mesh made of metal wire, fiberglass, or other synthetic fiber and stretched in a frame of wood or metal. It serves to keep leaves, debris, insects, birds, and other animals from entering a building or a screened structure such as a porch, without blocking fresh air-flow. Most houses in Australia, the United States and Canada and other parts of the world ha

Source: Window screen – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Window screen

From E.T. Barnum's Catalog of Wire Goods, 1874; despite its use of racist dialect—typical in advertising of the era—this illustration accurately depicts conditions in a house without screens.

Prior to 1870, swarms of flies and mosquitoes were best kept at bay by keeping windows closed—even in summer—or covering one or two with cheesecloth. Wooden-framed wire cloth window screens “made the difference,” promised an 1873 advertisement, “between absolute misery and sweetest comfort.”

Source: Window screen

History of Insect Screen, Which Type for Your Replacement Windows?

On July 7, 1868, Bayley and McCluskey filed a U.S. Patent, number 79541 for screened roof-top rail-car windows, allowing ventilation, while preventing “sparks, cinders, dust, etc.” from entering the passenger compartment. By 1874, E.T. Barnum Company of Detroit, Michigan advertised screens that were sold by the square foot. Apparently, window screens designed specifically to prevent insect entry were not patented in the United States, although by 1900 several patents were awarded for particular innovations related to window screen design

Source: History of Insect Screen, Which Type for Your Replacement Windows?

Measuring Basics for Window Screens

Image result for image on measuring tape

The most important step in ordering replacement screens to meet your needs is providing accurate measurements for the project. With so many different styles of windows and doors available, make sure you are getting your dimensions based on the Measuring Guide that best matches your project from the options below. ScreenItAgain replacement screens are manufactured to precise standards and guaranteed to be within 1/16″ of the dimensions you provide. We will do everything possible to help you obtain accurate measurements for your project, but the final dimensions are still your responsibility. Measure twice, order once!

Source: Measuring Basics